Risk Management: Protecting Your Brand on Social Media

By Jessica Ullrich There are a number of benefits for brands that build an engaging presence on social networking sites. Businesses that succeed at social media marketing are able to create unofficial brand ambassadors that are genuinely excited about their products and services and willing to share them with family and friends. But there are also several obvious risks for brands using social media to connect with customers. From illegitimate pages and pornographic avatars to brand attacks of a political nature, companies are often faced with a number of challenges when they take their marketing efforts online. Due to the sheer size and ever-changing nature of social networks, these issues can be difficult to track and regulate. If they aren’t dealt with quickly, brands can lose customers and their reputations can be adversely affected.How should companies manage risk? After all, participation in digital forums is no longer optional for businesses that want to grow. But managing the risk exposure of your brand can be a full-time job and the vast majority of companies are unable to staff accordingly. Experts in the risk management industry have the following recommendations for companies looking for ways to protect their brands on social media.Implement a social media usage policy for staff and audiencesAnyone can create a brand profile online. A common case study, especially for small to medium-sized businesses, is that a well-intentioned member of your marketing team might think that they are helping spread the word about your business by launching a branded Twitter account. But there are a few inherent issues with this approach if accounts aren’t part of a broader social media strategy or provided oversight for brand consistency.One common issue is that it can be confusing for potential customers who may be getting conflicting messages from multiple brand profiles. Dan Nadir, VP of Product Management at Nexgate, a social media and brand protection company says that, “Despite having good intentions, the content that’s posted on an unofficial account may or may not align well with brand messaging. Even worse, completely fake brand accounts are frequently created that attempt to embarrass the brand or defraud unsuspecting customers.”In other cases, like the recent US Airways Twitter debacle where an employee accidentally tweeted a pornographic image to an unhappy customer, shared content is harmful and embarrassing. Similarly, it is important to have guidelines for the audience or community you are allowing to share content on your accounts and pages. For example, having a link to an acceptable content use policy on your company’s Facebook page should be required and allows your brand to be clear about content that can and can’t be shared. That way, in the scenario where an audience member comments on a Facebook post with an X-rated image or a link to one, it is clear why it may be deleted. For companies interested in protecting their brand online, the first steps are to implement and enforce a social media usage and content policies for staff that regulates personal use while on the job, branded account use by employees, and content policies for the audience of branded accounts.Be proactive and diplomatic when handling customer issuesThere have been countless media reports of companies behaving badly on social media, from community managers deleting customers’ posts and team members responding inappropriately to customer concerns to robot tweets from well-known brands. One recent example is a large bank that came under fire in 2013 for auto-posting generic responses to Twitter users.When it comes to handling customer issues online, it’s important for company employees to be well trained and diplomatic with their responses in order to effectively protect the brand. Deleting customer complaints and replying with robotic responses that aren’t addressing the issue can do more harm to your company than good. The most effective social media policies include a clear chain of management and escalation, for when front-line marketing or customer service staff don’t have an understanding of what to do.Monitor potentially damaging scenariosAnother issue that businesses need to be aware of is the world of negative SEO: when others create social media pages or profiles with the intention of harming your business. Nadir says, “It takes just minutes for someone to start up a fake business account. They can reach out to fans with the promise of special discounts if they provide their credit card information.”That’s not the only issue that brands need to monitor. Another common problem is social media users with pornographic avatars posting content on unsuspecting company pages and even posting pornographic content on the account. Twitter revised their terms of service in 2009 to help keep pornography out of users’ profile pictures, but it’s still a lingering problem on many social networking sites. As a result, businesses are looking to use content moderation solutions that identify and filter out content posted by users with pornographic avatars or pornographic content itself. Nexgate has paired up with UK-based image scanning technology provider Image Analyzer with the intention of extending their image analysis capabilities to provide the broadest coverage for automatically keeping pornographic content from showing up on clients’ blogs and social media accounts. This technology approach will provide the speed, scale and efficiency in content removal that frees moderation teams and services to focus on real customer and community engagement versus burning time and service fees on reviewing and handling obviously bad content. There are countless benefits for companies that choose to add social media to their marketing toolkits, but there are also a number of risks. In order to help mitigate risk, businesses need to be proactive about social media usage policies and staff training. It’s also important to handle customer issues professionally and monitor potentially damaging issues. But for most companies, the benefits outweigh the risks. Nadir says, “Unlike many other channels, brands have the ability to target their customers very specifically. They can really focus in on getting specific messages to certain groups and then creating and fostering real engagement with those individuals or groups.” …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

How to Get More Retweets and Shares from Your Social Media Content

By Brett Relander According to a Forester Report published by CMO, advertising spending on social media platforms is expected to increase by double digits by 2019. Currently, social media content is how most people follow what is going on in the world. If you want to reach your target audience, you need to use social media. Shares and retweets are excellent for your message to go viral and ensure it ends up in front of as many potential leads as possible. With that said, there is no a magic wand you can wave to make your social media content go viral. There are a few steps you can take to get more shares and retweets from your social media content. The most important step to create social media content with the potential to go viral is to simply make sure you are tuned into your industry. This will ensure that when something important breaks, you are to date, and can take advantage of opportunities as they arise. One great tool that helps you to stay on top of news is Google Alerts. With Google Alerts, you can subscribe to company blogs that are relevant to your industry, thus ensuring that you are always current.Keep in mind that while it is important to stay current, if you are going to create material that gets the most possible shares and retweets, you need to differentiate your content. Ask yourself: what it is about your content that would cause a reader to hit the retweet or share button? What is your spin on the story? Focus on coming up with something original.Remember to focus on “why it matters”. Make a point of giving your readers valuable information. Too often companies approach content marketing by simply spewing information without saying anything that actually matters. Do not leave your readers in a position of wondering why they bothered to read your content. Remember that your readers’ time is valuable. Make sure that they are glad they took time out of their busy schedules to read what you had to say.Regardless of how great your content might be, there is little chance that it will be shared if you do not create a plan for actively promoting and making it shareable. For example, think about elements you can add to your content that will increase the likelihood of being shared, such as video or images.Take the time to get to know the various social media channels and the types of content that is most likely to be shared on those platforms. According to a report published by Quick Sprout, users on Twitter are more likely to tweet images than videos. In fact, images are retweeted 128% more than videos. The report indicated that the majority of images retweeted were humorous. While there is a common perception that the most popular tweets are related to personal stories, the Quick Sprout report found that in terms of retweeting, list-based articles and “how-to” articles received three times more retweets than any other type of content.In the process of writing content that is worthy of being retweeted, always keep length in mind. Twitter-based content is usually short. In order to increase the likelihood of being retweeted, keep your message well under the maximum character limit, so that users do not have to worry about editing the initial tweet. Make it as easy as possible for users to retweet your message.Facebook tends to work differently than Twitter in terms of content sharing. According to eMarketer, photos are the most popular type of content shared on Facebook. In fact, photos comprise 75% of the content on Facebook. When you create content specifically for a Facebook campaign, including photos is an excellent way to gain more attention. This is mainly due to the fact that photos tend to be easier to consume than large chunks of text. Keep in mind that not all photos are the same. When creating shareable photo-based content, make sure that you only use high-quality photos. It is also important to include relevant links with all images that you post on Facebook in order to divert traffic back to your website.Understanding the importance of comments and how they work in relation to shares is vital, particularly with Facebook. A Social Intelligence Report published by Adobe Digital Index found that Facebook comments have increased by 16% this year compared to last year. This is good news, as it indicates that fans are taking the time and the effort to make comments on content that they find interesting. In order to take full advantage of this trend, be sure to reply anytime a fan comments on the content that you post. Not only is this the polite thing to do, but it can also serve to drive more shares. Your user will receive a notification about the like, which could encourage more comments. To gain more exposure for your brand, it is also a good idea to “like” comments made by users not only as yourself, but also as the Facebook business page.Finally, do not expect to churn out a one-hit wonder on any social media platform if you do not participate frequently. If you are focused on Twitter, then make it a point to tweet often, and meaningfully interact with others. The same strategy also applies to Facebook and other social media platforms. By doing so, you ensure that when you do post content that is worthy of sharing, others on that platform will sit up and take notice. …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

Facebook Mythbusting: Copyright Disclaimers

By Lauren Mikov Maybe it’s because I’m a professional social media manager or maybe it’s just because I find chain-letter posts incredibly annoying, but I often find myself playing the role of mythbuster on some friends’ Facebook posts. One chain-letter type post stands out as a particularly frustrating repeat offender: copyright disclaimers. In this post, I will explain this myth and how you can help keep it from spreading. (Disclaimer: While I am a social media consultant, I am not a lawyer and this post should not be construed as legal advice.) Myth: By copying and pasting a legal-sounding disclaimer from a friend’s post, you can claim and maintain copyright to your content. Here’s one example (via Snopes): In response to the new Facebook guidelines I hereby declare that my copyright is attached to all of my personal details, illustrations, comics, paintings, photos and videos, etc. (as a result of the Berner Convention). For commercial use of the above my written consent is needed at all times! (Anyone reading this can copy this text and paste it on their Facebook Wall. This will place them under protection of copyright laws, By the present communiqué, I notify Facebook that it is strictly forbidden to disclose, copy, distribute, disseminate, or take any other action against me on the basis of this profile and/or its contents. The aforementioned prohibited actions also apply to employees, students, agents and/or any staff under Facebook’s direction or control. The content of this profile is private and confidential information. The violation of my privacy is punished by law(UCC 1 1-308-308 1-103 and the Rome Statute). Facebook is now an open capital entity. All members are recommended to publish a notice like this, or if you prefer, you may copy and paste this version. If you do not publish a statement at least once, you will be tacitly allowing the use of elements such as your photos as well as the information contained in your profile status updates. Mythbusting Proof: Here’s the relevant excerpt from Facebook’s terms that disproves this myth. For content that is covered by intellectual property rights, like photos and videos (IP content), you specifically give us the following permission, subject to your privacy and application settings: you grant us a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on or in connection with Facebook (IP License). This IP License ends when you delete your IP content or your account unless your content has been shared with others, and they have not deleted it.Why It’s Bad: This type of post is harmful because it leads users to believe that by posting a privacy disclaimer they automatically have some right to the content they share on Facebook, which is absolutely incorrect. As much as it might bother you, by agreeing to Facebook’s terms and conditions (which you do by using or even just logging into the site,) you automatically waive all rights to your content. Spreading this myth is particularly harmful to artists or others for whom copyright is literally valuable. Leading people who make money off of their content to believe that posting a disclaimer once gives them copyright can lead to financial consequences if their content is then used without their knowledge or consent and without generating royalties for them. An example might be a photographer who uploads an image to Facebook, thinking that because they posted this disclaimer, they maintain the copyright. Under Facebook’s terms, Facebook can use the image on ads and elsewhere, or transfer rights to another entity, without paying the photographer any royalties or even giving credit. Knowing that Facebook has the rights to any content they upload might prevent the photographer from uploading valuable content. The more we can educate ourselves about Facebook’s terms of service, the more careful we can be about what we share. Do This Instead: If you are truly concerned about maintaining control of your content, delete your Facebook account and track down any content shared by your friends, or anyone else, and ask them to remove it from Facebook. If you, like me, can’t imagine life without a Facebook account and you see a version of the copyright disclaimer in your Timeline, you can stop its spread by pointing out that it is a myth. Often simply posting a link to Snopes works just fine. And finally, the most important step you can take in being a Facebook mythbuster is to read Facebook’s terms, a.k.a the Statement of Rights and Responsibilities. If you’re going to be a user of a site that owns your content copyright, you might as well be an informed user. …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

Why Video Collaboration Is Key to Building Smarter Workforces

By Daniel Newman Given the current trend of taking office spaces from the physical to the virtual realm, working together from diverse locations across the world is not at all uncommon. This has changed the way we collaborate and the way we co-work. However, while we often no longer consider physical presence as an important factor when it comes to attending a meeting or a conference, face-to-face meetings are still important. Face-to-face interaction fosters credibility, a sense of connectedness, and plays an important role in building relationships. But in person, face-to-face meetings aren’t always possible. That’s where video conferencing systems in today’s business environment can bridge distance and bring people close together, even though they are actually physically miles apart. Cloud-enabled video conferencing or video collaboration is quickly becoming an integral part of modern companies that wish to cultivate smarter workforces.What exactly is video collaboration?So, what is video collaboration? It’s a cloud-based application that allows you to hold live video communication from anywhere in the world. Video collaboration helps you participate in meetings, discussions, and conferences, in real time without incurring the high expenses involved with the purchase of hardware, equipment installation and, of course, the cost of travel. But that’s not all. There are even more benefits of video collaboration—let’s talk about how it can help businesses build smarter workforces.How video collaboration helps businesses build a smart work culture:Remote and flexible work arrangements: Remote working is a concept that’s growing in popularity. Employees love it and employers are growing more comfortable with remote working all the time, realizing that the benefits include enhanced productivity and a happier workforce, to name just a few. As this work arrangement becomes increasingly more popular, the need for better tools for collaboration is increasing, too. Video collaboration is being embraced as a platform that improves collaboration inside as well as outside of the organization.Better interaction among the workforce: As remote working becomes more popular, however, it’s important to leverage technology to keep people connected and collaborating efficiently and effectively. Today’s nomadic work culture can breed problems related to detachment and lack of interaction among co-workers who hardly meet each other, and that’s never a desired result. Leveraging innovations like cloud-based video collaboration helps foster teamwork, boost morale and team spirit, and encourages teams to remain connected and productive—a win for everyone!Eliminating geographic limitations: Thanks to video collaboration, geographic limitations can no longer impede a company’s growth. While previously recruiting a workforce from a different location was unimaginable, today, hiring a candidate who lives in a different time-zone is not an issue at all. By enabling face-to-face interviews from multiple locations, video collaboration may also help in the process of recruitment, and help to streamline human resources processes. This gives companies the leverage to tap into the talented workforce and potential candidates from all over the world.More productive meetings: Since video collaboration allows you to hold meetings on a virtual level, you can make sure that your meetings are on topic and to-the-point. With cloud-based video technology, you can quickly and easily arrange a meeting or a presentation on a short notice, just as you can in an office environment. Enabling your scattered workforce to come together at a single point, you can improve productivity while it can also lead to better team-building within your workforce.Reduced costs: As an organization, travel costs are inevitable. However, traveling contributes to a fair share of expenses which can be significantly lowered by deploying video collaboration platforms. By leveraging technology and using video collaboration more effectively in certain situations, you can significantly reduce your travel budget. In addition, and one of the real beauties of cloud technology, is that your access is in the cloud, not in expensive hardware and software upgrades and a need to set up a dedicated infrastructure for video conferencing.Today’s businesses recognize video collaboration as a key factor in staying ahead of the curve by outsmarting their competitors. Since video collaboration can empower you with multiple benefits, you should consider this as a viable strategy towards building a smart and motivated workforce.Have you integrated video collaboration within the communication modules of your business? We’d love to hear how it’s impacted your business operations.Disclaimer: This blog was written as part of the Connect With Ricoh Innovative Ideas program and was first seen here. While I was compensated for this post, the ideas and views are my own. Photo: shutterstock …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

The State of Video Marketing in 2014 [INFOGRAPHIC]

By Jonathan Savage Video marketing has continued to go from strength to strength in 2014. In a recent study 95% of B2B businesses stated that video marketing was both valuable and important. The consumption of video is also on the rise. By 2018 it is predicted that 79% of all internet traffic will be video. A significant portion of that growth is coming from mobile. In fact, mobile now makes up nearly 40% of mobile watch time on YouTube and 65% on Facebook!Another interesting development this year has been the rise of Facebook as a serious competitor to YouTube. Facebook recently stated that the site receives 1 billion views a day of their video content.Take a closer look at these statistics, and others, in more detail to help to paint a picture of the video marketing industry in 2014.81 % of companies are producing video content for their websiteVideo is no longer a niche form of marketing. Online video is now well established as a central part of most businesses marketing strategy. This is being driven by the shift in content consumption patterns by consumers towards video. Technological advancements have also made it easier to both produce and deliver video content.(2014 Online Video Production Survey and Industry Trends Report)More than a third of marketers (35%) are planning on using short form video as part of their marketingShort form video, such as vine, is a relatively new addition to marketers toolbox. Despite its novelty it has quickly become a favorite with many brands.(2014 Social Media Marketing Industry Report)73% marketers plan to increase their use of original videosUse of video for content marketing has increased significantly, but this trend is in no danger of plateauing. We can expect to see more spending on video marketing in 2015.(2014 Social Media Marketing Industry Report)Globally, IP video traffic will be 79 percent of all consumer Internet traffic in 2018, up from 66 percent in 2013Video is becoming an increasingly popular way to consume content on the internet. Cheaper, faster and more accessible internet connections are making it ever more viable for consumers to watch video. This trend is only going to continue in the future. Thanks to the ease and lowered cost of producing video, the volume which is being produced is massive.It is predicted it will take an individual over 5 million years to watch the amount of video that will cross global IP networks each month in 2018The popularity of online video as a marketing strategy creates both opportunities and challenges. Increased competition means that video marketers are going to need to raise their game if they are going to stand out. Consumers are simply going to ignore content which fails to grab attention and provide value.(Cisco Visual Networking Index: Forecast and Methodology, 2013–2018)65% of video views on Facebook are from mobile devicesOne of the most important considerations for marketers using video is the move towards using mobile devices to consume video. On Facebook the majority of users are already watching video on mobile devices. For YouTube the figure is just under half but this number is growing.(Facebook Newsroom)48% of B2B buyers use their smartphone to watch videoAnd it is not just for social video which is performing well on mobile. Branded video content is also becoming much more important for B2B marketers as well. Thinking about how prospective customers will consume the content on the smaller screen should be something that all B2B video marketers consider.(Internet Retailer)68% of respondents say their online video budgets will increase in 2014Perhaps one of the best indicators that video marketing is proving real ROI is that businesses are voting with their wallets. Businesses are choosing to spend more money on video as part of their marketing budgets.(B2C Content Marketing 2014)72% of respondents use YouTube for their marketingVideo watching on Facebook may be on the rise, but YouTube is still proving to be a firm favorite with marketers for video marketing. With more than one billion unique visitors to YouTube a month, that is perhaps no surprise.(2014 State Of Marketing)91.975% of most frequent video rich snippet domains is YouTubePerhaps not surprisingly Google has helped boost YouTube when it made changes to the way it displayed rich snippets this year. Research appears to show Google overwhelmingly favors YouTube results for the rich snippets that it shows.(Wistia: Where did my snippets go?)Over 70% of respondents claim that video performs better than other content for producing conversionsMost importantly video marketing is delivering results for business where it counts: sales and leads. More than two thirds of B2B businesses surveyed say that video is outperforming other forms of content. Another great reason why all businesses, whether they are B2C or B2B, should be investing in video marketing.(B2B Video Marketing Benchmark Report) …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

Why Bold Leadership Will Drive the Internet of Things

By David H Deans The Internet of Things (IoT) is poised to potentially generate huge new market opportunities for current information technology (IT) or telecom companies and new start-up companies, according to the latest global market study by CompTIA.While IT executives are evenly split on the question of whether IoT is reality or hype, CompTIA asserts that the complex mix of hardware, software and professional services in the IoT ecosystem could create a high probability of upside growth for the industry.”Many IoT elements are rooted in traditional IT components, which is good news for IT companies experienced in building and linking complex systems,” said Seth Robinson, senior director, technology analysis, CompTIA.He added, “At the same time, we’re likely to see the emergence of many new firms focused on specific aspects of these systems, such as devices and data analysis. The true value of IoT will come from the combination and connectivity of all pieces.”It’s also likely that bold leaders will quickly emerge and they will set the pace for continued momentum, particularly as it relates to concerns about regulatory compliance.Decisive Leaders vs. Hesitant FollowersThe CompTIA survey data reveals an element of uncertainty around IoT, likely causing some to withhold judgment until the IoT ecosystem further matures. Meanwhile, as the gutless flock of me-too vendors sit on the sidelines, the pioneers will confidently move forward with their market development strategies.Besides, while IT industry as a whole sits at the center of developing, supporting and maintaining IoT, revenue and value is open to any vendor that will demonstrate a compelling point of view.Today’s IoT marketplace presents savvy and decisive leaders with the prospect of exploring innovative approaches — now, before the hesitant followers enter the arena.According to the CompTIA assessment, IT executives identified several areas where they expect IoT to have the greatest impact and deliver value in the long term. Those areas include:Creating new revenue and business opportunities from connected systems (e.g., smart cities, connected vehicles).Controlling and monitoring newly connected pieces of equipment.Collecting new streams of data.Adding intelligence to previously “dumb” objects and systems.Gathering contextual information about customers.”The true value of IoT lies not just in the data being generated and captured, but through the services that protect the data, perform the analysis and present findings in a usable way,” Robinson concluded.internet of thngs / shutterstock …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

SMT Shorts: Neil Capel on Big Data and Keeping the Customer [VIDEO]

By Carianne King Here’s our latest installment of SMT Shorts, a series that addresses your social media and marketing questions with concise, expert answers. This week, Neil Capel, CEO and Founder, Sailthru, discussed how to keep the customer after you get ’em, whether consistency across channels matters, and the first steps you should take if you’re scared of Big Data. Thanks to Neil for lending his expertise! Subscribe to our YouTube page to keep yourself up to date with not only our SMT Shorts, but other great video content as well.First question: “Everyone talks about getting the customer, but how do you keep the customer?” Second: “Is it best to tailor your voice to each channel, or make sure your voice is consistent across channels?”And last, the Big Data question: “I’m scared of big data, but everyone says I need to catch on. What’s the best way to approach it for a newbie social marketer?” Thanks for watching. And stay tuned for more SMT Shorts with our experts! …read more

Source: Social Media Today

    

20 SEO Sumos to Follow on Twitter

By Matthew Capala A couple of months ago one of the guest speakers in my NYU class presented a slide during her talk with a list of 5 SEOs to follow on Twitter. I couldn’t believe how much interest this one slide generated – all the students got on high alert and started jotting down names or taking pictures of the slides with their cell phones. Same thing happens every time I speak at a conference.The Power of Curated ListsI think most of the marketers underestimate the power of curated lists, and how much users actually love them. Brands want to tell stories and they want the content to be about them. They stay away from lists, so it’s a land-grab for smart, creative entrepreneurs.The businesses that understand the power of ‘listicles,’ such as Mashable, thrive and grow at rates unheard of in corporate America. Moz 10 Top leads the way on the SEO scene, for example. Successful business models were built by companies such as Thrilist or AppSumo that put 99% of their marketing efforts on lead generation and newsletter marketing. Look up the three companies I mentioned here if you don’t already know them to learn more.Ok, now it’s my turn. A week ago I published my new Kindle book, 99 SEO Tools for 99 Cents, and I thought it would be a cool book marketing strategy to include a bonus chapter with a resource of the top 20 SEO folks to follow on Twitter. The book landed on the Amazon bestseller list in “search engine optimization” category, and I already got some good feedback on the value the list provided.20 SEO Influencers to Follow on TwitterHere is a totally subjective list of the top SEOs to follow on Twitter (in no particular order). This is not an SEO seniority list or yet another popularity contest for link building. If you follow the SEO folks listed below, you are in a good company.Below I shared (almost) all the names included in my 99 SEO Tools for 99 Cents. All but ONE. What’s the name of the most influential SEO sumo on the planet? Who is she/he? Drop a note in the comments section if you have any ideas. It’s an easy guess… I hope. @M______ ← ???????????@RandFish ← Rand Fishkin, Moz@iPullRank ← Mike King, iPullRank@DannySullivan ← Danny Sullivan, Search Engine Land & SMX@JennyHalasz ← Jenny Halasz, JLH Marketing@DuaneForrester ← Duane Forrester, Bing@Fighto ← Paul Shapiro, Catalyst@Backlinko ← Brian Dean, Backlinko@DanCristo ← Dan Cristo, Triberr@Rhea ← Rhea Drysdale, Outspoken Media@Emcgillivray ← Erica Mcgillivray, Moz@Dr_Pete ← Dr. Pete Myers, Moz@StoneTample ← Eric Enge, Stone Temple Consulting@SankarPonnusamy ← Sankar Ponnusamy, Priceline@SyrusShepard ← Cyrus Shepard, Moz@Sonray ← Jason White, DragonSearch@MarkTraphagen ← Mark Traphagen, Stone Temple@GregBoser ← Greg Boser, Foundation Digital@BrentCarnduff ← Brent Carnduff, Echelon SEO@Btabke ← Brett Tabke, Pubcon & Webmaster WorldIf you think there are important names that are missing from the list, send me suggestions on Twitter at @SearchDecoder or drop a note in the comments section.photo credit: szeke via photopin cc …read more

Source: Social Media Today